CRM Solution Software

CRM Software Solutions

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CRM software blueprint
An Executive's Guide to CRM Software

Real World CRM

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Every business or not-for-profit entity encounters at least one volatile client relationship, be it with a precarious, necessary vendor or the essential consumer. Some behemoths, like Boeing compete with corporations funded by entire blocks of countries and fueled not by profit but by market share. Real life Client Relationship Management, and the CRM software that supports it, is centered on survival, and the first rule of thumb is keeping your current client base. Expanding it is vital to continued success, but letting erosion occur dooms an entity to failure, whether it is a commercial business or not-for-profit (NFP).

Every year Jerry Lewis’s annual telethon reaps an increase over the previous year. The marketing, publicity, and star value attracted to this charity event rivals the Superbowl. It relies on a database populated with the name of every donor still living. This organization jealousy guards its client list. Why? For the same reason everyone hangs up on telemarketers - intensive marketing to the same database steals value from the products themselves. Implementing a standard Client Relationship Management system without tailoring it to meet your specific business objectives is not real-world CRM.

By definition CRM in today’s information age is all about specificity and knowing that individual client better than the competition. Building that picture of a particular consumer pixel by pixel, until the illustration is perfect, until the entity can anticipate a client’s needs. Real-world CRM is a constant battle for knowledge supremacy.

Every organization faces competition and real-world CRM provides the tool to win opportunities. Omaha Steaks for example, competes with Wine Country Gift baskets seasonally, in particular during the Christmas season, and each has its own definable solution in place. Yet, consider the Wine Country strategy over Omaha’s. The choice between a vanilla email from Omaha Steaks advertising a Christmas special, and the CD Wine Country sends via snail mail. With Omaha, the consumer must visit the company’s web site and enter the detailed information for every gift given, names, addresses and greetings. With Wine Country, the customer simply inserts the CD and makes only the necessary changes. Who knows their client better? Which is the least effort choice?

A vital aspect of real world Client Relationship Management is security. Consider the slew of sensational media exposes over the last few years related to breached credit cards, health insurance, and bank databases. Experts predict that the current low rate of identity theft is an anomaly, and the burgeoning of a new industry, albeit not a legal one, in the startup phase and heading for hyper-growth. The saying goes that if the automobile industry had developed the way the information sector has, a Hummer would require a total capital outlay of under a thousand dollars and obtain a hundred miles to the gallon.

Think of the Internet in 1980. Think of it today. Extrapolate a similar analysis to identify theft, and the implications are dark and ominous. For entities in sensitive sectors, such as security, banking, and health care, security becomes paramount when considering real world Client Relationship Management systems. As Internet crime proliferates and matures, it becomes impossible to speculate accurately as to where it will be in twenty years, and what ramifications that will have on real world CRM. Of course as with every choice, there are tradeoffs associated with ensuring high levels of security and maintaining such a system.  

However, if a consumer is given a choice between one of the credit companies recently featured in the media exposes and one advertising watertight security, it is obvious where the consumer will gravitate. An organization deploying real-world CRM must deliberate and determine security needs in the context of customer confidentiality and value.

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CRM Introduction Real World CRM Executives Guide to SFA Marketing Automation Customer Support
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